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12 quick fixes for your household things

by Alexandra Zega

By Adam Bluestein

Fifteen-minute home projects that won't put a dent in your weekend.

Toothpaste
Photo: Hallie Burton

Scuffed Linoleum

Rub the spot with white toothpaste and a dry cloth or with an eraser. Or spray WD-40 on a towel and rub lightly, making sure to degrease the area afterward with liquid dishwashing soap and water.

Cutting board
Photo: Hallie Burton

Dry Cutting Board

Revive your board by gently warming a bottle of pure mineral oil (available at drugstores) in a bowl of hot water, then wiping the oil onto the surface with a soft cloth. Wipe off the excess four to six hours later.

Spray lubricant
Photo: Hallie Burton

Stuck Sliding Windows

A little silicone spray lubricant (sold at hardware stores) will grease the skids. Spray it onto a rag, then wipe along the tracks, whether they’re metal, wood, or plastic.

Down cushions
Photo: Hallie Burton

Flattened Down Cushions

Put them outside in the sun for a few hours, flipping them halfway through. (Be careful―leaving them out too long may fade the fabric.) The sun will help evaporate the moisture that gets into the filling over time, and the cushions should plump up nicely.

Decanter
Photo: Hallie Burton

Dirty Decanter

Fill the decanter halfway with hot water, a few drops of liquid dishwashing soap, two tablespoons of white vinegar, and a cup of uncooked rice. Swirl the rice around for a few minutes to remove the residue, rinse with hot water, and air-dry.

Extension cords
Photo: Hallie Burton

Tangled Extension Cords

Cowgirls and sailors alike know the benefits of storing ropes neatly coiled. Follow their lead and keep extension cords tangle-free and contained inside a large plastic bucket when they’re not in use.

Paper
Photo: Hallie Burton

Peeling Wallpaper

With a knife, smear wallpaper paste onto a piece of writing paper. Rub the paper against the underside of the peeling section. Press the wallpaper against the wall. Slide the writing paper out and smooth away bubbles with a clean cloth.

Sponge
Photo: Hallie Burton

Worn Caning

A little sagging over time is natural but reversible. To tighten caning back up, use a sponge to wet the underside with warm water. Let dry slowly overnight. Repeat if necessary.

Chandeliers
Photo: Hallie Burton

Dusty Chandelier

Allow the fixture to cool. Wear a pair of white cotton gloves―one dry, one dampened with glass cleaner. (For crystal, use one part rubbing alcohol to three parts distilled water.) Wipe each prism with the damp glove, then the dry one.

WD-40
Photo: Hallie Burton

Hard-to-Remove Decals

Spray the decals and the surrounding areas with WD-40, lifting the edges to get underneath, if possible. Let sit, then gently scrape away the decal with the edge of a credit card. Degrease the tub with liquid dishwashing soap.

Light bulbs
Photo: Hallie Burton

Hard-to-Remove Light Bulb

Press the center of a foot-long strip of duct tape onto the middle of the bulb. Fold each loose end in half so it sticks onto itself. Gripping each end between your thumb and index finger, give a counterclockwise twist to loosen the bulb.

Tubs
Photo: Hallie Burton

Stained Tub

Combine equal amounts of cream of tartar and baking soda with enough lemon juice to make a paste. Rub the mixture into the stain with your fingers or a soft cloth. Let sit for a half hour, then rinse well with water.

 

 
 

 

How to: Delete your Google Web History

by Alexandra Zega

One area this is most clear is with search. Our search histories can reveal a lot about us: what we like or dislike, our religion, political leanings, sexual preferences, age, and even health information. As it stands today, all that data collected through searches performed while logged into your Google account has been kept separate from the troves of other data the company has in its coffers. That will all change come next Thursday. Unless, of course, you delete all of it. And here’s how you can do that in less than a minute:

• First, go to google.com/history. There, you’ll be asked to sign into your Google account.

• Second, click the “Remove all Web History” button. And that’s it! You’re done. Not only is all your search data removed from Google’s grasps, but doing this automatically pauses Web History, meaning no more information will be collected until you click the blue “Resume” button at the top of the page.

(Note: If you have more than one Google account, you’ll have to do this whole process for each of them.)

If you want to be less drastic, you can also go through your entire Web History (an activity your author found both intriguing and truly frightening), and pick out the bits and pieces you’d rather Google not know about. You can then simply hit the “Pause” button, and no more search data will be collected.

Please note: This doesn’t not stop Google from collecting all types of information about you. To do that, you’re going to have to go through a lot more steps, many of which the Electronic Frontier Foundation has spelled out here.

One pleasant effect of deleting your Web History is that it does away with much of the bad parts of Google’s personalized Search Plus Your World. To thoroughly eradicate that monstrosity from your life, follow these steps outlined here.

This article was originally posted on Digital Trends.

 

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